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April 2, 2010
David Warsh, Proprietor


About

Frequently Asked Questions

What is Economic Principals?
Is it a column?
Where did EP come from?
Who is EP’s proprietor?
What does EP cover?
Who reads it?
How many?
How frequently?
How does EP sustain itself?
How can I contribute?
How can I reach EP?

* * *
What is Economic Principals?

Economic Principals.com is an experiment in online economics journalism — a Web-based independent weekly commentary on the production and distribution of economic ideas.

It is not a blog.

Is it a column?

Not exactly, though it used to be one.   A newspaper column is a device designed to spark up the news report a little, literally a column of type that exists in relation to the rest of a complicated whole. Web-based EP is embedded in a much looser community, consisting of economic journalists writing, mainly in English, in newspapers, magazines and books around the world. A weekly?   An online column?   Take your pick.

Where did EP come from?

Economic Principals appeared for more than 18 years as a column in the Business section of The Boston Globe. It moved to the Web in March 2002. Although its resources are reduced, the spirit of the online project remains much the same as in the newspaper version — to keep track of what’s going on in technical economics through the device of weekly profiles of various movers and shakers (hence the pun) and to offer occasional commentary on political economy. A collection of those newspaper columns was published by The Free Press in 1993 as Economic Principals: Masters and Mavericks of Modern Economics. Accounts of EP’s evolution online appeared in December 2004 as A Report to Readers; in November 2005 as It’s Worth What You Pay for It; and in September 2007 as The Second Century of The Boston Evening Transcript.

Who is EP’s proprietor?

David Warsh covered economics for The Boston Globe 22 years and, earlier, reported on business for The Wall Street Journal and Forbes and from Saigon for Pacific Stars and Stripes and Newsweek . He is a graduate of Harvard College in Social Studies and a two-time winner of financial journalism’s Loeb Award. In 2004 he was the J.P. Morgan Prize Fellow at the American Academy in Berlin.

What does EP cover?

EP reports mainly on university economics, as it affects historical awareness, political debate and public policy. It seeks to put under-noticed economic journalism in touch with a wider audience. EP is not about the business cycle.

Who reads it?

Economists, lawyers, journalists, managers, policy-makers, educators, lobbyists, investors, citizens — anyone interested in the connections between university economics and the rest of the world.

How many?

EP regularly reaches around 20,000 readers in more than 100 countries.

How frequently?

EP is published weekly on Sunday evenings. An early (bulldog) edition goes to paid subscribers Saturday night.

How does EP sustain itself?

EP moved to pixels from print in a hurry, without much thought for the morrow.   For two years it experimented with various approaches, before settling on a model something like that of public radio in the United States – a relative handful of civic-minded citizens supporting a service relied upon by many and available for free to all. Today, an annual $50 subscription to its bulldog edition brings an early version of the weekly via email about a day before it is posted on the Web, where it (and its archive) is available free. Subscribers also receive quarterly reports designed to take them behind the scenes.

How can I contribute?

Suggestions, recommendations, amplifications, corrections, letters, advice and, especially, invitations are always welcome. But EP’s chief support derives those $50 subscriptions to its bulldog edition.

How can I reach EP?

By mail: 52 Berkeley Street, Somerville, Massachusetts 02143.
By telephone: 1.617.666.3365
By email: warsh@economicprincipals.com


Skim past columns here.


Support Economic Principals by subscribing to its bulldog edition—receive the weekly via email a day before it is posted on the Web, and, as well, a quarterly Report to Subscribers.

To reach the proprietor, ask a question about the website or report a problem email warsh@economicprincipals.com.